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Friday, May 18, 2018

What about Christian Names & Patron Saints?


HEAVEN ON EARTH - ORTHODOXY


What about Christian Names & Patron Saints?

The Orthodox Church has always placed great significance upon names.  In fact,  not only are names of great import in the Church,  but the actual process of naming someone holds great significance to us.  These customs are of divine origin and of tremendous significance,  but unfortunately are not a part of modern American culture.  The significance of names and naming is one area where Orthodox Tradition will inevitably effect the American practice, and is also an area where we must be on guard of the reverse effect and of allowing American culture to rob the Church of meaningful and universal customs.

The Scriptural Background.

Creation-  The significance of names is evident at the very beginning of Biblical history.  God had just made the heavens and the earth in six days, and finally finished his glorious work of creation by fashioning man from the dust of the earth.  After Adam (whose name in Hebrew means "earth" or "ground" from which he was made) was created something very interesting takes place.  God brings all of the animals which had been made on the previous days to Adam so that Adam can name them (Gen. 2:19).  Whatever Adam named the animal is what the animal was called.  Now this all was very meaningful.  Not only was Adam's headship over all of creation demonstrated by the fact that he was fashioned as the pinacle of creation at the end of the sixth day,  but his superiority to the animal kingdom was demonstrated by his power to name them and in so doing define them.  By naming the animals Adam's authority over them was expressed, and Adam imaged God who had first named him.  Man was to lead the physical creation in the worship and service of the Holy Trinity.  He was to subdue and rule over the world, and the first act of this regal life was the process of naming the animals.

Shortly thereafter God fashioned a wife for Adam out of his side.  Adam called his new wife "woman" because she was taken out of man (Gen. 2:23).  Her name showed her very nature as being derived from man ("For man does not originate from woman, but woman from man", 1Cor. 11:8).  After the evil serpent tempted our first parents and led them to sin bringing death into the world, God intervened and promised the Redeemer would come from the woman's seed to crush the serpent and trample down death by death (Gen. 3:15).  As a result of this Adam named his wife "Eve", which means "life" or "life-producer".  Her name explained who she was.  She was the one through whom Christ would come, who would give life to the world.  The fact that Adam did the naming was a sign that he was Eve's head and protector, and that she would find her fulfillment and destiny under his leadership.

As an interesting sidenote, one of the marks of the inroads of unhealthy feminism in our culture is the wife's rejection of the husband's name.  Many women today refuse to take their new husbands' last names at marriage,  and it is vogue also for women to hyphenate their maiden names with their husbands' names.  Also popular today is the combining of the husband's and wife's surnames into a

Thursday, May 17, 2018

How does one pick a baptismal name when one converts?


How does one pick a baptismal name when one converts? 

There is no “universal, standard” way by which a name is selected. In some traditions, for example, it is the custom to name a person after the saint commemorated on his or her date of birth. In other cases names are selected based on devotion to a particular saint. And, of course, there are those who select a name exclusively on personal preference.

It is interesting to note, however, that in the Orthodox Church the naming of a person occurs in a special rite celebrated on the eighth day after birth, thereby separating this action from the celebration of Baptism and Chrismation.

In the case of adult conversions, it would seem that the most meaningful way of selecting a “Christian” name would be to choose the name of a saint whose life one may especially wish to emulate or whose life offered special inspiration on the road to conversion.

It is always wise to discuss such matters with your parish priest who can offer personal direction in greater detail.

Source:

https://oca.org

https://oca.org/questions/sevensacraments/baptismal-names

ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

What is a Baptismal name?


FAITHBOOK - ORTHODOXY


What is a Baptismal name?

A baptismal name is a name given to a newly-baptised Orthodox Christian. For a lengthy time in Orthodox history, Orthodox Christians have been given the names of Orthodox saints.

The following is a list of names who have:

—Orthodox saints, perhaps unexpectedly, attached to either the original name (e.g. Theophany for Tiffany) or to a diminutive (e.g. Gerald for Jerry), or
—Orthodox saints whose names mean the same thing (e.g. St Alban for Bianca [both mean 'white'], or St Maurice for Blake [both mean 'black']).
—If these are not available, a 'closest match' may be given, where the name sounds similar to a saint's name (e.g. St Rumon for Raymond).

However, this is not designed to be a list for existing matchups which have no relation.

A
Key: If a name has a saint directly attached to it (or a foreign/derivative form of it), then Saint is used; if the name is short for a longer name, then Diminutive is used; if the name is known to have the same meaning as one for a saint's name, then Meaning is used; if it is known only that the name sounds similar, then Sound-alike is used.
Aaliyah (f) - see Alia (Diminutive)
Aaron (m) - St Aaron the Priest (Sunday of the Forefathers - Saint) [1]
Abigail, Abby (f) - Venerable Virgin-martyr Æbbe the Younger of Coldingham, Abbess of Coldingham Priory (April 2 - Sound-alike)
Adalyn, Adaline (f) - see Adele (Derivative)
Adam (m) - (Sunday of the Forefathers - Saint)
Addison (f) - see Madison (Diminutive)

Sunday, May 6, 2018

What joy does the Nativity of the Mother of God bring us?


HOLY VIRGIN MARY MOTHER OF GOD



What joy does the Nativity of the Mother of God bring us?

Saint John of Kronstadt, Russia (+1908)

What joy does the Nativity of the Mother of God bring us? Let us explain in more detail the Church hymn which explains the meaning of this feast’s joy. Through the birth of the Ever-Virgin, through Her only-begotten Son and God, cursed and outcast mankind makes peace with God Who is immeasurably offended by man’s sins, for Christ became the mediator of this peace (cf. Rom. 5:10-11). Man is freed from the curse and eternal death, made worthy of the blessing of the Heavenly Father; he is united and co-mingled with the Divine nature; he is raised to his first inheritance by this co-mingling, according to the Church hymn. Mankind, once an outcast, has been made worthy of sonship to the Heavenly Father, received the promise of the glorious resurrection and eternal life in the heavens together with the angels.

This has all been and is being wrought by the Son of God incarnate from the Most Pure Virgin from the Holy Spirit, and by the intercession of His Most Pure Mother. How honored and magnified is mankind through the Holy Virgin Mother of God, for it has been made worthy of renewal and sonship by God; She Herself was made worthy by Her immeasurable humility and exceedingly great purity and holiness to be the Mother of the God-man!

+ St. John of Kronstadt, Sorrow and Joy: A Homily on the Day of the Nativity of the Most Holy Mother of God

Source:

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com/2015/09/18/st-john-of-kronstadt-what-joy-does-the-nativity-of-the-mother-of-god-bring-us/

ORTHODOX CHURCH QUOTES

What is the Orthodox Church?



What is the Orthodox Church?

Saint Sebastian Dabovich of Jackson & San Francisco, CA, USA (+1940):

WHAT is the Orthodox Church? The Orthodox Church is a body or community of people, who, 1—correctly believe in divine revelation; and 2—who obey a lawful hierarchy instituted by our Lord Jesus Christ himself, through the holy apostles. In order to belong to the Orthodox Church two principal conditions are required: First—to accurately accept, rightly understand and truthfully confess the divine teaching of faith; and secondly— to acknowledge the lawful hierarchy or priesthood, to receive from it the holy mysteries or sacraments, and generally to follow its precepts in matters concerning salvation.

+ St. Sebastian Dabovich, Preaching in the Orthodox Church: Lectures and Sermons by a Priest of the Holy Orthodox Church

Source:



ORTHODOX CHURCH QUOTES

Why did [the Prodigal Son] not set off at once instead of a few days after?


COMING HOME - ORTHODOXY



Why did [the Prodigal Son] not set off at once instead of a few days after?

Saint Gregory Palamas (+1359)

“And not many days after,” it says, “the younger son gather all together, and took his journey into a far country” (Luke 15:13). Why did [the Prodigal Son] not set off at once instead of a few days after? The evil prompter, the devil, does not simultaneously suggest to us that we should do what we like and that we should sin. Instead he cunningly beguiles us little by little, whispering, “Even if you live independently without going to God’s Church or listening to the Church teacher, you will still be able to see for yourself what your duty is and not depart from what is good.” When he separates someone from the divine services and obedience to the holy teachers, he also distances him from God’s vigilance and surrenders him to evil deeds. God is everywhere present. Only one thing is far away from His goodness: evil. Being in the power of evil through sin we set off on a journey far away from God. As David says to God, “The evil shall not stand in thy sight” (Ps. 5:5).

+ St. Gregory Palamas, The Parables of Jesus, Sermons by St. Gregory Palamas

Source:

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com

http://www.orthodoxchurchquotes.com/2016/02/28/5100/

ORTHODOX CHURCH QUOTES